Clinical evaluation of the stability of single-segment short pedicle screw fixation for the reconstruction of lumbar and sacral tuberculosis lesions.

By London Spine
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Clinical evaluation of the stability of single-segment short pedicle screw fixation for the reconstruction of lumbar and sacral tuberculosis lesions.

Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2012 Oct;132(10):1429-35

Authors: Jin W, Wang Z

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The routine surgical approach to posterior reconstruction in spinal tuberculosis is short- or long-segment fixation and/or fusion. This method sacrifices movement at more than one vertebral level, limits normal movement of the spinal column, and leads to degeneration of the small joints of the adjacent levels. Surgical techniques that reduce the number of fixed vertebral levels and maximize the retention of movement of the spinal column are of current interest in the treatment of spinal tuberculosis.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 106 patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis were randomly divided into two groups: a single-segment fixation group and a short-segment fixation group. After posterior correction and internal fixation, all patients underwent anterior radical debridement and interbody fusion with bone grafting.
RESULTS: The mean postoperative follow-up period was 58.09 ± 17.01 months. The average bone graft healing time was 4.35 ± 1.04 months in the single-segment group and 4.47 ± 1.10 months in the short-segment group. In the single-segment group, correction of the Cobb angle was 14.47 ± 3.76° and the loss rate was 7.22 %, and in the short-segment group, correction of the Cobb angle was 16.20 ± 2.70° and the loss rate was 6.37 % (P < 0.05). Patients with operative time, blood loss, costs in the single-segment group were significantly reduced than the short-segment group (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: Single-segment pedicle screw fixation and correction surgery can fix and fuse the diseased segment in lumbar and sacral tuberculosis, retain normal movement in the adjacent spinal column, and promote functional recovery of the spinal column postoperatively. It was be regarded as a cost-effective means of treatment with lumbar and sacral tuberculosis.

PMID: 22736022 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

[Lumbar total disc replacement. Short-term results].

By London Spine
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[Lumbar total disc replacement. Short-term results].

Acta Chir Orthop Traumatol Cech. 2012;79(1):37-40

Authors: Matějka J, Zeman J, Matějka T, Nepraš P, Belatka J

Abstract
PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: Motion-preservation technologies for spinal disorders have evolved and come into use in the last decade. Three principal systems are currently available: total disc replacement, posterior neutralisation transpedicular system and interspinous implants. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our group of lumbar total disc replacements at a follow-up of 2 years.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 42 disc prostheses were implanted in 37 patients. Of these, 31 with 35 artificial discs were followed up for 2 years. There were 11 men and 20 women with an average age of 42.9 years (range, 21 to 61 years). The indication for surgery was lumbar disc pain without radicular syndrome and contraindications included advanced degenerative facet joint disease and obesity with a body mass index over 30. Surgery was carried out through the pararectal retroperitoneal approach. Early and late complications were recorded. The group evaluation was based on radiological outcomes, and VAS and ODI scores reported by the patients at 6 weeks, and 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery.
RESULTS: The average operative time was 68 minutes (range, 36 to 120 min) for single-level lumbar total disc replacement and 92 minutes (range, 72 to 130 min) for two-level procedures. The average hospital stay was 5.2 days (range, 3 to 12). Both keels of the prosthesis were in the exact center in 25 cases, they were shifted laterally in nine cases up to 2 mm and in one case more than 2 mm. Horizontal rotation of the prosthesis was seen in two patients, but not more than 5 degrees to the left. There was no disc loosening or subsidence, and no acceleration of adjacent segment degeneration. Two patients showed heterotopic ossification. Subjective evaluation was recorded as marked improvement in 15, partial improvement in 11 and no change in five patients. None of the patients reported deterioration. Low back pain assessed by the VAS score had an average value of 66.3 before surgery and 14.1 at 2 years after surgery. The average pre-operative ODI value was 48.9 and that at 2 years post-operatively was 24.5.
DISCUSSION: Pain relief evaluated by the VAS score in our study is comparable with or slightly better than is reported by the other authors. Some recorded average values for lumbago were 74 before surgery and 35 at 2 years of follow-up, or 62.3 before and 25.4 at 2 years after surgery, while our patients had the average VAS score of 66.3 before surgery and that of 18.4 at 2 years after surgery. The ODI values in our group were similar to those of other authors. When we compare this group with the group of our patients who were treated by spinal fusion surgery, the outcomes at 1 year are better in the total disc replacement group, as shown by the VAS for lumbago of 17.8 and ODI of 24.5 in the former versus the respective values of 18.1 and 29.0 in the latter group.
CONCLUSION: Based on the results it can be concluded that total disc replacement is an efficient method of treating degenerative intervertebral disc disease of the lumbar spine in young, active and motivated patients with no posterior spinal structure degeneration.

PMID: 22405547 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Posterior decompression and short segmental pedicle screw fixation combined with vertebroplasty for Kümmell’s disease with neurological deficits.

By London Spine
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Posterior decompression and short segmental pedicle screw fixation combined with vertebroplasty for Kümmell’s disease with neurological deficits.

Exp Ther Med. 2013 Feb;5(2):517-522

Authors: Zhang GQ, Gao YZ, Zheng J, Luo JP, Tang C, Chen SL, Wang HQ, Liu K, Xie RG

Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment of Kümmell’s disease with neurological deficits and to determine whether intravertebral clefts are a pathognomonic sign of Kümmell’s disease. A total of 17 patients who had initially been diagnosed with Kümmell’s disease were admitted, one patient was excluded from this study. Posterior decompression and vertebroplasty for the affected vertebrae were conducted. Pedicle screw fixation and posterolateral bone grafts were performed one level above and one level below the affected vertebrae. Vertebral tissue was extracted for histopathological examination. The mean time of follow-up was 22 months (range, 18 to 42 months). The anterior and middle vertebral heights were measured on standing lateral radiographs prior to surgery, one day postoperatively and at final follow-up. The Cobb angle, the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Frankel classification were used to evaluate the effects of the surgery. The VAS, anterior and middle vertebral heights and the Cobb angle were improved significantly one day postoperatively and at the final follow-up compared with the preoperative examinations (P<0.05). No significant differences were observed between the one-day postoperative results and those at final follow-up (P>0.05). The neurological function of all patients was improved by at least one Frankel grade. All patients in this study exhibited intravertebral clefts, and postoperative pathology revealed bone necrosis. One patient (not included in this study) showed an intravertebral cleft, but the pathology report indicated a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The intravertebral cleft sign is not pathognomonic of Kümmell’s disease. Posterior decompression with short-segment fixation and fusion combined with vertebroplasty is an effective treatment for Kümmell’s disease with neurological deficits.

PMID: 23403724 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]