Do Regenerative Medicine Therapies Provide Long-Term Relief in Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Metaanalysis.

By London Spine

Related Articles Do Regenerative Medicine Therapies Provide Long-Term Relief in Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Metaanalysis. Pain Physician. 2018 Nov;21(6):515-540 Authors: Sanapati J, Manchikanti L, Atluri S, Jordan S, Albers SL, Pappolla MA, Kaye AD, Candido KD, Pampati V, Hirsch JA Abstract BACKGROUND: Several cell-based therapies have been proposed in recent years…

Platelet-rich plasma products in sports medicine

By London Spine

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy is a recently developed technique that uses a concentrated portion of autologous blood to try to improve and accelerate the healing of various tissues. There is considerable interest in using these PRP products for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, particularly athletic injuries. Because PRP products are safe and easy to prepare…

Survey of European pain medicine practice.

By London Spine
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Survey of European pain medicine practice.

Pain Physician. 2012 Nov-Dec;15(6):E983-94

Authors: Gupta S, Gupta M, Nath S, Hess GM

Abstract
This survey was undertaken to explore the variation in the functional constitution of pain clinics in Europe. In addition, we also explored the amount of training which doctors practicing pain medicine typically receive. Approximate hospital charges for common pain interventions and the source of funding were also surveyed. Members of the British Pain Society (Interventional Pain Medicine-Special Interest Group) and other pain physicians in Europe responded through the online questionnaire tool “Survey Monkey.” About 215 requests were sent; 82 pain practitioners from 13 countries in Europe responded. This survey indicates that chronic pain interventions are primarily funded either through government or insurance companies. The primary chronic pain service members continue to be anesthesiologists, combined with specialist nurses and physiotherapists. There appears to be some consistency, both with regard to working in a multidisciplinary team, and the training required to become a pain specialist. More than half of the respondents reported the cost of common interventions like caudal epidural steroid injection (ESI), transforaminal ESI, 3 level medial branch blocks, and 6 level facet joint injections to fall under the €500 range ($645). Two thirds of the respondents reported the cost of 4-joint radiofrequency lumbar denervation to be less than €1,500 ($1,935). Good practice should ensure an adequate duration of training, and development of a pain faculty to ensure standards of assessments across the continent. A more detailed, large scale survey is perhaps required to map the availability of chronic pain services and understand the health economics in pain medicine across Europe.

PMID: 23159983 [PubMed – in process]

[Spontaneous infectious spondylodiscitis in an internal medicine department: epidemiological and clinical study in 41 cases].

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[Spontaneous infectious spondylodiscitis in an internal medicine department: epidemiological and clinical study in 41 cases].

Rev Clin Esp. 2008 Jul-Aug;208(7):347-52

Authors: Martínez Hernández PL, Amer López M, Zamora Vargas F, García de Paso P, Navarro San Francisco C, Pérez Fernández E, Montoya Lozano F, Vázquez Muñoz E

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The clinical-epidemiological characteristics of patients who were diagnosed of spontaneous infectious spondylodiscitis (SIS) in our Internal Medicine Department are analyzed and the related factors associated with the increase of the incidence are evaluated.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional, retrospective study of patients diagnosed of SIS from 1996 to 2005 was conducted. The study was divided in two periods: A (1996-2000) and B (2001-2005) and two main etiologic groups (pyogenic SIS and mycobacterial SIS) were compared.
RESULTS: A total of 41 patients were diagnosed of SIS: 13 (31.7%) in period A and 28 (68.3%) in period B. Mean age was 58.5 +/- 17.6 years (range: 29-89). There were 73.2% men and all women presented in period B (0 vs 11, p = 0.008). Backgrounds were: 28 (68.3%) predisposing factors for SIS, 22 (53.6%), previous infections and 23 (56.1%) spinal diseases. There were not changes in the backgrounds during the study. The etiology of SIS was: 26 (63.4%) pyogenic, 12 (29.3%) mycobacterial and 3 (7.3%) brucellar. Patients with pyogenic SIS were older (63.6 +/- 3.2 vs 51.2 +/- 5.1 years, p = 0.035) and had less from onset of symptoms to diagnosis (62 +/- 12 vs 291 +/- 66 days, p = 0.0001) than patients with mycobacterial SIS. Total incidence of SIS and incidence of pyogenic SIS increased significantly during the study: (1.7/1000 admissions/year, p = 0.0057) and (1/1000 admissions/year, p = 0.0476). In the multivariate analysis, time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was the only variable independently associated with the pyogenic etiological group (OR: 0.985, 95% CI: 0.975, 0.996, p = 0.005).
CONCLUSIONS: In our study, the increasing incidence of SIS was related to an increase in pyogenic SIS incidence. Although older age and some backgrounds could be orientative of SIS etiology, these factors did not increase during the study.

PMID: 18625181 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]