Efficacy of percutaneous laser disc decompression on lumbar spinal stenosis

By London Spine

The objective of this study is to observe the effect of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) on lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-two LSS patients were treated using pulsed Nd: YAG laser, of which 21 cases (11 males and 10 females with an average age of 64 years old) were followed up for 2 years. All of the 21 patients had intermittent claudication with negative straight leg raising test results. Fifteen patients suffered from anterior central disc herniation which often compressed the cauda equina but seldom compressed the posterior part; six patients suffered from posterior ligamentum flavum hypertrophy which often compressed the cauda equina but seldom compressed the anterior part. The efficacy was evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery on 21 patients using the performance evaluation criteria of the lumbago treatment by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA 29 scores). The fineness (i.e. excellent and good treatment outcome) rate 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after the operation were 46.7%, 66.7%, 66.7%, 66.7% and 66.7%, respectively, in patients with severe anterior compression and 16.7%, 33.3%, 33.3%, 33.3% and 33.3%, respectively, in patients with severe posterior compression. PLDD had certain positive efficacy on the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis, which was more significant on LSS dominated by the anterior compression than that by the posterior compression

Spinal hernia tissue autofluorescence spectrum

By London Spine

The laser intervertebral disc decompression may provide appropriate relief in properly selected patients with contained disc herniations. The present investigation aims to characterise intervertebral disc material by autofluorescence induced by laser light. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is associated with progressive biochemical changes in disc material. Percutaneous laser disc decompression has become rather popular for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation, but there are problems in the selection of patients. For this purpose, recognition of the disc composition is necessary. We propose a new type of spectroscopic investigation. It is advantageous to the characterization of intervertebral disc material. Intervertebral disc specimens were removed during open surgery from different disc locations. Preoperative patients’ MRI was evaluated using the Pfirrmann disc degeneration and Komori scale for migrating of herniated nucleus pulposus. Adjacent slices of stained disc sections were evaluated by histology/histochemistry and autofluorescence spectra. Comparison of the MRI, spectral, histological and histochemical data was performed. The MRI Komori scale correlated with the histology Boos degeneration index. In the histochemistry, collagens other than collagens I and II of the disc were distinguished with best positive correlation coefficient (0.829) and best negative one (-0.904) of proteoglycans of sequester to Boos index. A correlation of the IV Gaussian component of the hernia spectra with the Boos index was established. The Gaussian component correlation with different collagen types and proteoglycan was determined for the disc and sequester. ‘Autofluorescence-based diagnosis’ refers to the evaluation of disc degeneration by histological and histochemical evaluation; it can provide additional data on the degeneration of an intervertebral disc

Muscle fiber conduction velocity and EMG amplitude of the upper trapezius muscle in healthy subjects after low-level laser irradiation: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

By London Spine
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Muscle fiber conduction velocity and EMG amplitude of the upper trapezius muscle in healthy subjects after low-level laser irradiation: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

Lasers Med Sci. 2017 Dec 05;:

Authors: Sarilho de Mendonça F, de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho P, Biasotto-Gonzalez DA, Calamita SAP, de Paula Gomes CAF, Amorim CF, Fumagalli MA, Politti F

Abstract
Although low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an important resource for the treatment of non-specific neck pain patients, the dose which presents the greatest therapeutic potential for the treatment of this pathology is still unclear. The present study aimed to evaluate the immediate effect of LLLT on the muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and electromyographic activity (EMG) of the upper trapezius (UT) muscle in healthy individuals. A total of 20 healthy subjects were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Active LLLT (820 nm wavelength, 30 mW, energy total 18 J) or placebo LLLT (pLLLT) was delivered on the UT muscle. Each subject was subjected to a single session of active LLLT and pLLLT. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signal of the UT muscle was recorded during five different step contractions of shoulder elevation force (10-30% maximal voluntary contraction) pre- and post-LLLT irradiation. The values of MFCV and sEMG global amplitude (RMSG) were used to calculate the effects of LLLT. The results showed no difference in the MFCV comparing the LLLT and pLLLT groups (F = 0.72 p = 0.39, η p2 = 0.004). However, a significant difference was observed in the RMSG between the LLLT and pLLLT (F 1,2 = 16.66; P < 0.0001, η p2 = 0.09). Individuals who received active LLLT presented a significant decrease in RMSG after laser application (F = 61.28; p < 0.0001, η p2 = 0.43). In conclusion, the 820 nm LLLT, with energy total of 18 J, did not alter the MFCV but significantly reduced the sEMG signal amplitude of the upper trapezius muscle in healthy subjects to a level of up to 30% of maximal voluntary contraction.

PMID: 29204914 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Short-term therapeutic effects of 890-nanometer light therapy for chronic low back pain: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study.

By London Spine
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Short-term therapeutic effects of 890-nanometer light therapy for chronic low back pain: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study.

Lasers Med Sci. 2013 Jul 3;

Authors: Hsieh RL, Lee WC

Abstract
We conducted a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study to investigate the effects of short-term 890-nm light therapy in patients with chronic low back pain in a rehabilitation clinic. Thirty-eight women and 22 men with chronic low back pain (mean age, 60.3 years; range, 32-80 years) received 40-min sessions of hot-pack therapy combined with active or placebo 890-nm light therapy (wavelength = 890 nm, radiant power output = 6.24 W, power density = 34.7 mW/cm(2) for 40 min, total energy = 83.2 J/cm(2)) over the lower back three times weekly for 2 weeks. Participants were assessed before and after treatment by using a range of motion measurements, a visual analog scale evaluation of pain, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, the Biodex Stability System, the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, repeated chair-rising times, the Frenchay Activity Index, the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ), and the Osteoarthritis Quality of Life Questionnaire. The severity of disability based on the ODQ score was used as the primary clinical outcome measurement. Compared to the baseline measurements, participants in the treatment group reported significant reductions in fear-avoidance beliefs regarding physical activity (P = 0.040) and work (P = 0.007) and in the severity of disability (P = 0.021). Treatment with hot-pack therapy and 890-nm light therapy was associated with reductions in the severity of disability and fear avoidance beliefs in patients with chronic low back pain.

PMID: 23820974 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]