Balloon Kyphoplasty Procedure

By Jaimig Aljorna

Kyphosis is an exaggerated forward bend of the back. Age-related kyphosis is often due to the weakness of the bones of the spine. This increases the risks of further fractures in the contiguous vertebrae. Kyphosis causes chronic pain, breathing problems, loss of appetite and sleeping problems. What Is Balloon Kyphoplasty Surgery? Balloon Kyphoplasty (BKP) is…

Kyphosis – London Spine Specialists

By Jaimig Aljorna

Kyphosis is an abnormal curvature of the upper back spine (greater than 50 degrees). As a result, it creates a stooped appearance in the posture. Kyphosis can develop at any age and can affect both men and women. While the condition usually develops in the upper posterior part (thoracic spine), the development of kyphosis in…

Late treatment of tuberculosis-associated kyphosis: literature review and experience from a SRS-GOP site.

By London Spine
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Late treatment of tuberculosis-associated kyphosis: literature review and experience from a SRS-GOP site.

Eur Spine J. 2012 May 25;

Authors: Boachie-Adjei O, Papadopoulos EC, Pellisé F, Cunningham ME, Perez-Grueso FS, Gupta M, Lonner B, Paonessa K, King A, Sacramento C, Kim HJ, Mendelow M, Yazici M

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Spinal tuberculosis (TB) accounts for approximately half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Kyphosis is the rule in spinal tuberculosis and has potential detrimental effects on both the spinal cord and pulmonary function. Late-onset paraplegia is best avoided with the surgical correction of severe kyphosis, where at the same time anterior decompression of the cord is performed and the remnants of the tuberculosis-destroyed vertebral bodies are excised. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Review of the literature on late surgical treatment of TB-associated kyphosis; description and comparative analysis of the different surgical techniques. RESULTS: Kyphosis can be corrected either at the acute stage or at the healed late stage of tuberculous infection. In the late stage, the stiffness of the spine and chronic lung disease are additional considerations for the surgical approach and technique. Contrary to the traditional anterior transpleural approach used in the acute spinal tuberculosis infection, extrapleural approaches, either antero-lateral or direct posterior, are favored in late treatment. CONCLUSION: The correction of deformity is only feasible with three-column osteotomies, and posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) is the treatment of choice in extreme kyphosis. The prognosis of the neurologic deficit (late paraplegia) is dependent on the extent of gliosis of the spinal cord.

PMID: 22627623 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Natural history of Pott’s kyphosis.

By London Spine
Related Articles

Natural history of Pott’s kyphosis.

Eur Spine J. 2012 May 15;

Authors: Rajasekaran S

Abstract
The natural history of Pott’s kyphosis is different from that of other spinal deformities. After healing of the spinal infection, the post-tubercular kyphosis in adults is static but in children variable progression of the kyphosis is seen. The changes occurring in the spine of children, after the healing of the tubercular lesion, are more significant than the changes that occur during the active stage of infection. During growth, there is a decrease in deformity in 44 % of the children, an increase in deformity in 39 % of the children and no change in deformity in 17 % of the children. The critical factor leading to the progress of the deformity is dislocation of the facets. This can be identified on radiographs by the “Spine-at-risk” signs. Dislocation of facets at more than two levels can lead to the “Buckling collapse” of the spine, which is characteristically seen only in severe tubercular kyphosis in children. Age below 10 years, vertebral body loss of more than 1-1.5 pre-treatment deformity angle of greater than 30° and involvement of cervicothoracic or thoracolumbar junction are the other risk factors for deformity progression. In children, the kyphosis can progress even after healing of the spinal infection and hence children with spinal tuberculosis must be followed-up till skeletal maturity.

PMID: 22584918 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Kyphectomy for severe kyphosis with pyogenic spondylitis associated with myelomeningocele: a case report.

By London Spine
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Kyphectomy for severe kyphosis with pyogenic spondylitis associated with myelomeningocele: a case report.

Scoliosis. 2011;6(1):5

Authors: Yoshioka K, Watanabe K, Toyama Y, Chiba K, Matsumoto M

Abstract
A 32-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for a refractory ulcer on her back. She had a history of myelomeningocele with spina bifida that was treated surgically at birth. The ulcer was located at the apex of the kyphosis. An X-ray film revealed a kyphosis of 154° between L1 and 3 and a scoliosis of 60° between T11 and L5. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and laboratory data indicated the presence of a pyogenic spondylitis at L2/3. To correct the kyphosis and remove the infected vertebrae together with the skin ulcer, kyphectomy was performed. Pedicle screws were inserted from T8 to T12 and from L4 to S1. The dural sac was transected and ligated at L2, followed by total kyphectomy of the L1-L3 vertebrae. The spinal column was reconstructed by approximating the ventral wall of the T12 vertebral body and the cranial endplate of the L4 vertebra. Postoperatively, the kyphosis was corrected to 61° and the scoliosis was corrected to 22°. In the present case, we treated the skin ulcer and pyogenic spondylitis successfully by kyphectomy, thereby, preventing recurrence of the ulcer and infection, and simultaneously obtaining sufficient correction of the spinal deformity.

PMID: 21477271 [PubMed]

Kyphosis correction after vertebroplasty in osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

By London Spine
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Kyphosis correction after vertebroplasty in osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

Acta Bioeng Biomech. 2012;14(4):63-9

Authors: Dragan SF, Urbański W, Zywirski B, Krawczyk A, Kulej M, Dragan SŁ

Abstract
Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive method of treating vertebral compression fractures aimed mainly at reduction of pain. It has been observed that fractured vertebral bodies filled in with cement might also influence the increase of their height and thus lead to reduction of post-traumatic spine kyphosis. The aim of the research was to assess the possibility of reducing the kyphotic deformation of operated spine through kyphosis measurement of vertebras adjacent to fracture. 24 patients underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty on account of compression fracture of 40 vertebral bodies in thoracic and lumbar regions. On digital x-ray spine images taken in patients before and after surgery the angle of kyphosis or lordosis of bodies above and below the fractured vertebra was measured with the use of the Cobb method. Vertebroplasty in the material examined caused reduction of kyphosis in 33 cases (80.48%) and correction by 5.78° on average. No regularity was found either between the occurrence of correction (and its level) and operated spine region or between the possibility of kyphosis correction and time that passed between fracture and surgery.

PMID: 23394347 [PubMed – in process]