Medical device on pharmacists’ work-related musculoskeletal complaints and burnouts.

By London Spine
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Medical device on pharmacists’ work-related musculoskeletal complaints and burnouts.

Ergonomics. 2012;55(11):1420-8

Authors: Chou YC, Chen CL, Wu TH

Abstract
This study analysed the total number of consumed vials of chemotherapy drugs during the year 2007 to determine workloads, and investigated the effects of using the Spike medical device in contrast to the use of traditional needles on oncology pharmacists’ dispensing time, muscle soreness, work-related burnout and fatigue symptoms. Work-related burnout and physiological symptoms were measured using the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI) and a visual analogue pain scale. The Spike device significantly reduced the time spent in drawing up fluorouracil (39.46 ± 9.43 s vs. 57.13 ± 13.47 s) or cisplatin (29.65 ± 11.22 s vs. 60.93 ± 20.54 s) compared with traditional needles (P < 0.001). The CBI burnout score improved significantly with the Spike device (53.21 ± 8.58 vs. 73.21 ± 5.42; P = 0.007) because finger and palm muscle soreness complaints and subjective fatigue symptoms for eye tiredness and shoulder-wrist pain were significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Practitioner Summary The pharmacist needs to exert hand strength to counter the vial back-suction pressure to draw out the medical liquid, and confirm the volume during the drawing antineoplastic drug procedure. This study aimed to determine the effects of using a medical device, instead of a needle, on pharmacists’ work-related musculoskeletal complaints and burnouts.

PMID: 22928595 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Estimation of lumbar spinal loading and trunk muscle forces during asymmetric lifting tasks: application of whole-body musculoskeletal modelling in OpenSim.

By London Spine
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Estimation of lumbar spinal loading and trunk muscle forces during asymmetric lifting tasks: application of whole-body musculoskeletal modelling in OpenSim.

Ergonomics. 2017 Apr;60(4):563-576

Authors: Kim HK, Zhang Y

Abstract
Large spinal compressive force combined with axial torsional shear force during asymmetric lifting tasks is highly associated with lower back injury (LBI). The aim of this study was to estimate lumbar spinal loading and muscle forces during symmetric lifting (SL) and asymmetric lifting (AL) tasks using a whole-body musculoskeletal modelling approach. Thirteen healthy males lifted loads of 7 and 12 kg under two lifting conditions (SL and AL). Kinematic data and ground reaction force data were collected and then processed by a whole-body musculoskeletal model. The results show AL produced a significantly higher peak lateral shear force as well as greater peak force of psoas major, quadratus lumborum, multifidus, iliocostalis lumborum pars lumborum, longissimus thoracis pars lumborum and external oblique than SL. The greater lateral shear forces combined with higher muscle force and asymmetrical muscle contractions may have the biomechanical mechanism responsible for the increased risk of LBI during AL. Practitioner Summary: Estimating lumbar spinal loading and muscle forces during free-dynamic asymmetric lifting tasks with a whole-body musculoskeletal modelling in OpenSim is the core value of this research. The results show that certain muscle groups are fundamentally responsible for asymmetric movement, thereby producing high lumbar spinal loading and muscle forces, which may increase risks of LBI during asymmetric lifting tasks.

PMID: 27194401 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

The effects of police duty belt and seat design changes on lumbar spine posture, driver contact pressure and discomfort.

By London Spine
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The effects of police duty belt and seat design changes on lumbar spine posture, driver contact pressure and discomfort.

Ergonomics. 2013;56(1):126-36

Authors: Holmes MW, McKinnon CD, Dickerson CR, Callaghan JP

Abstract
UNLABELLED: Police officers spend large amounts of time performing duties within a police cruiser and report a high prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. This study evaluated the effects of driver seat and duty belt design on posture, pressure and discomfort. Ten male and 10 female university students attended two sessions involving simulated driving in a standard police seat (CV) and an active lumbar support (ALS) seat. Participants wore a full duty belt (FDB) or reduced duty belt (RDB) in each seat. Lumbar postures, driver-seat and driver-duty belt pressures and perceived discomfort were measured. Gender × Seat interactions were found for pelvic (p = 0.0001) and lumbar postures (p = 0.003). Females had more lumbar flexion than males and were more extended in the ALS seat (-9.8 ± 11.3°) than CV seat (-19.8 ± 9.6°). The FDB had greater seat pressure than the RDB (p < 0.0001), which corresponded to increased pelvis discomfort. This study supports the use of an ALS seat and RDB to reduce injury risk associated with prolonged sitting in police officers.
PRACTITIONER SUMMARY: Police officers report a high prevalence of musculoskeletal problems to the lower back, associated with prolonged driving and further investigation is needed to reduce injury risk. This simulated driving study investigated seat and duty belt configuration on biomechanical measures and discomfort. Seat design had the greatest impact, regardless of gender and males benefited more from a reduced belt configuration.

PMID: 23140370 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]