Comprehensive treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders.

By London Spine
Related Articles

Comprehensive treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders.

Cranio. 2014 Jan;32(1):24-30

Authors: Navrátil L, Navratil V, Hajkova S, Hlinakova P, Dostalova T, Vranová J

Abstract
AIMS: Changing lifestyles, decreasing physical activity, which is increasing the number of degenerative joint diseases of various etiology, and certain dental procedures are increasing the number of patients complaining of pain in their temporomandibular joints. The aim of the study was to assess the benefits of comprehensive physiotherapy sessions in order to decrease the number of temporomandibular joint problems, thereby improving the patient’s quality of life.
METHODOLOGY: An examination by a dentist determined each patient’s treatment plan, which consisted of a medical exam, physical therapy and education. Each form of treatment was applied 10 times at intervals of 7-14 days. The main goal of the therapeutic physical education was to redress the muscle imbalance in the mandibular joint. This was achieved by restoring balance between the masticatory muscles, along with releasing the spastic shrouds found in the masticatory muscles. The aim of education was to teach the patient exercises focused on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. The intensity of the exercises and their composition were individually adjusted and adapted to their current state. Physical therapy consisted of the application of pulsed magnetic therapy, laser therapy, and non-invasive positive thermotherapy.
RESULTS: The above procedure was conducted on a therapeutic group of 24 patients (3 men and 20 women). In the course of therapy, there were no complications, and all patients adhered to the prescribed regime. None reported any side effects. The mean treatment duration was 123 +/- 66 days. The outcome of the therapy was evaluated as described in the methodology, the degree of pain affecting the joint, and the opening ability of the mouth. In both parameters, there was a significant decline in patient pain.
CONCLUSIONS: In a study devoted to tactics of rehabilitation treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, the need for comprehensive long-term therapy, involving education, and learning proper chewing habits was made apparent for recovery and pain reduction. A priority in physical therapy, and combinations of pulsed magnetic therapy and hyperthermia-positive peloids, are also beneficial.

PMID: 24660643 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Craniocervical posture and trigeminal nerve mechanosensitivity in subjects with a history of orthodontic use: a cross-sectional study.

By London Spine
Related Articles

Craniocervical posture and trigeminal nerve mechanosensitivity in subjects with a history of orthodontic use: a cross-sectional study.

Cranio. 2013 Oct;31(4):252-9

Authors: Heredia-Rizo AM, Oliva-Pascual-Vaca A, Rodríguez-Blanco C, Torres-Lagares D, Albornoz-Cabello M, Piña-Pozo F, Luque-Carrasco A

Abstract
The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether, in asymptomatic subjects, there are differences in: (i) head posture while sitting and standing still and (ii) trigeminal nerve mechanosensitivity, between those who have a history of using orthodontics and those who do not. The sample consisted of 72 subjects (21 +/- 2.14 years): one group who had used orthodontics in the past (n = 37), and another group who had not had previous orthodontic treatment (n = 35). The authors measured the CranioVertebral Angle (CVA) while the subject was sitting and standing still by means of lateral photographs, and the pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the trigeminal nerve. The orthodontics group showed a more upright position of the head when sitting compared to the non-orthodontics group, with the difference being statistically significant (ANOVA test; p < 0.001; F1,70 = 16.705; R2 = 0.19), but not for the standing position (p = 0.538). The values of the PPT in the trigeminal nerve (supraorbital-V1, infraorbital-V2 and mandibular-V3) were lower on both sides (dominant and nondominant) in the non-orthodontics group. The between-group comparison (ANOVA test) showed statistically significant differences for the trigeminal nerve PPT in its different branches (V1 p = 0.001; F1,70 = 13.012; R2 = 0.15) (V2 p = 0.004; F1,70 = 9.103; R2 = 0.11) (V3 p = 0.005; F1,70 = 8.228; R2 = 0.10). Based on these observations, it was concluded that subjects with a history of orthodontic use show a better sitting craniocervical posture and mechano-sensitivity of the trigeminal nerve branches compared to the group that had not used orthodontics in the past.

PMID: 24308098 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]