Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the ovine model.

By London Spine

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the ovine model.

J Vis Exp. 2009;(32):

Authors: Goldschlager T, Rosenfeld JV, Young IR, Jenkin G

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the most common surgical operation for cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy in patients who have failed conservative treatment. Since the operation was first described by Cloward and Smith and Robinson in 1958, a variety refinements in technique, graft material and implants have been made. In particular, there is a need for safe osteoinductive agents that could benefit selected patients. The ovine model has been shown to have anatomical, biomechanical, bone density and radiological properties that are similar to the human counterpart, the most similar level being C3/4. It is therefore an ideal model in which preclinical studies can be performed. In particular this methodology may be useful to researchers interested in evaluating different devices and biologics, including stem cells, for potential application in human spinal surgery.

PMID: 19806065 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Osteophyte formation after multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusion causing a delayed presentation of functional dysphagia.

By London Spine

Osteophyte formation after multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusion causing a delayed presentation of functional dysphagia.

Spine J. 2010 Jul;10(7):e1-5

Authors: Shih P, Simon PE, Pelzer HJ, Liu JC

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a common procedure used to treat radiculopathy and myelopathy from cervical degenerative disc disease. The complications for this procedure are well known. Dysphagia can occur in the postoperative setting. However, it is typically transient and does not last longer than 1 month after an operation. A de novo presentation of dysphagia occurring years after an operation is unique. Osteophyte formation can cause mass effect on the esophagus leading to obstruction of this conduit. However, there have been no reported cases of osteophyte growth fusing to surrounding structures leading to a functional dysphagia.

PMID: 20488764 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]