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Tag: adult scoliosis|article link|osteoporosis|Scoliosis

[Surgical management of adult scoliosis. The challenge of osteoporosis and adjacent level degeneration].

By wp_zaman

[Surgical management of adult scoliosis. The challenge of osteoporosis and adjacent level degeneration].

Orthopade. 2009 Feb;38(2):159-69

Authors: Quante M, Richter A, Thomsen B, Köszegvary M, Halm H

Adult scoliosis is defined as a spinal deformity with a Cobb angle of more than 10 degrees in the coronal plain in a skeletally mature patient. Patients predominantly suffer from back pain symptoms, often accompanied by signs of spinal stenosis (central as well as lateral). Asymmetric degeneration leads to asymmetric load and therefore to a progression of the degeneration and deformity as either scoliosis (0.5-1 degree per year), kyphosis, or both. The diagnostic evaluation includes static and dynamic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and myelo-computed tomography, as well as invasive diagnostic procedures such as discograms, facet blocks, and epidural and root blocks. The treatment, either conservative or surgical, is then tailored to the patient’s specific symptomatology. Surgical management is usually complex and must take into account an array of specific problems, including the patient’s age and general medical condition, the length of the fusion, the condition of the adjacent segments, the condition of the lumbosacral junction, osteoporosis, and any previous scoliosis surgery. The main goal of corrective surgery is a balancing of the coronal and sagittal planes.This review focuses on the special indications for vertebral body cement augmentation in patients with osteoporosis and the problem of adjacent level degeneration and its surgical management.

PMID: 19224265 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]