The effect of the adolescent growth spurt on early posterior spinal fusion in infantile and juvenile idiopathic scoliosis.

By London Spine

The effect of the adolescent growth spurt on early posterior spinal fusion in infantile and juvenile idiopathic scoliosis.

J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1983 May;65(3):247-54

Authors: Hefti FL, McMaster MJ

Twenty-four children with infantile or juvenile idiopathic scoliosis had their spines corrected and solidly fused posteriorly before the age of eleven years. The growth of the fusion area was then accurately measured for a mean of 4.5 years during the adolescent growth spurt. During this period all longitudinal growth in the posterior elements ceased. The vertebral bodies continued to grow anteriorly, but the thick posterior fusion prevented the development of a lordosis. Initially the anterior growth was accommodated by narrowing of the intervertebral disc spaces, but eventually the vertebral bodies bulged laterally towards the convexity and pivoted on the posterior fusion, giving rise to loss of correction, increasing vertebral rotation and recurrence of the rib hump.

PMID: 6841390 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]