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Tag: adolescence|article link|Scoliosis|thoracic scoliosis

Treatment for Severe Idiopathic Upper Thoracic Scoliosis in Adolescence.

By wp_zaman

Treatment for Severe Idiopathic Upper Thoracic Scoliosis in Adolescence.

J Spinal Disord Tech. 2012 Feb 16;

Authors: Zheng CK, Kan WS, Li P, Zhao ZG, Li K

Abstract
STUDY DESIGN:: To review the study of severe upper thoracic scoliosis (>90 degrees) in adolescence treated with pedicle screw constructs. OBJECTIVE:: The purpose of the present study was to analyze the treatment for upper thoracic scoliosis in adolescence. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:: Upper thoracic scoliosis is an uncommon spinal deformity in young children. Upper thoracic scoliosis is special. METHODS:: There were 21 patients (11 boys and 10 girls) with severe upper thoracic scoliosis and their mean age was 15 years (range, 13-18 y). The mean Cobb angle was 102.2 degrees (90-118 degrees) The clavicle angle ranged from 18 to 23 degrees, with an average of 21 degrees. Patients with the major curve of scoliosis located in the upper thoracic spine were treated with a posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw-only construct. There was a minimum 2-year follow-up. Follow-up information was obtained clinically and radiologically. RESULTS:: All patients underwent a posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw-only construct. Their shoulders were nearly balanced. The preoperative major curve was 102.2±8.9 degrees with a flexibility of 25.8%±8.1% in a side-bending film. The deformity was corrected to 29.7±5.9 and 32.1±5.6 degrees at the most recent follow-up. There was a 3.9-degree correction loss during the postoperative follow-up. There were no neurological or vascular complications at 2 years of follow-up. There was no crankshaft phenomenon. CONCLUSIONS:: The pedicle screw constructs can be safely used for severe upper thoracic scoliosis. Curve correction is powerful for these curves, which are stiff and difficult to manage. Screw accuracy was excellent in this review.

PMID: 22343348 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]