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Tag: Acta Neurochir Suppl

Spinal Cord Stimulation: An Alternative Concept of Rehabilitation?

By Kamruz Zaman
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Spinal Cord Stimulation: An Alternative Concept of Rehabilitation?

Acta Neurochir Suppl. 2017;124:15-18

Authors: Giugno A, Gulì C, Basile L, Graziano F, Maugeri R, Visocchi M, Iacopino DG

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Chronic low back and leg pain is a disabling condition, affecting, in most cases, older patients with congenital or acquired spinal stenosis or patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Spinal cord stimulation has been introduced as an effective therapeutic option for those patients who have previously been operated without significant clinical benefits, or for all those patients who are ineligible for traditional surgery.
METHODS: We report our experience with ten patients treated with spinal cord stimulation plus medication and physical therapy between November 2014 and September 2015. Inclusion criteria were: previous surgical treatments for lumbar stenosis and metameric instability and persistent or ingravescent disabling low back and leg pain, with a mean duration of symptoms of at least 18 months. A visual analog scale (VAS) was employed for back and leg pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score was determined, and findings were analyzed after 6 months.
FINDINGS: No intra- or postoperative complication was recorded. The mean VAS score for back pain decreased from 7.5 to 2.9, while leg VAS decreased from 8.2 to 3.0. Analysis of ODI values showed evident improvement in daily life activities, ranging from a median value of 75.7% to 32.7 % after the stimulation.
CONCLUSION: Spinal cord stimulation has a recognized impact on the pain and on the quality of life of patients with failed back surgery syndrome.

PMID: 28120047 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Minimally invasive treatment for refractory low back pain, targeted by epidural endoscopy with O2/O3 and steroid therapy.

By wp_zaman
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Minimally invasive treatment for refractory low back pain, targeted by epidural endoscopy with O2/O3 and steroid therapy.

Acta Neurochir Suppl. 2011;108:33-7

Authors: Masini M, Calaça A

Abstract
PURPOSE: Epidural endoscopy is an efficient option among conservative modalities in the management of refractory low back pain. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate retrospectively the effectiveness of the treatment of this condition with targeted O(2)/O(3) and steroid therapy.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: The procedures were performed in 32 consecutive patients who failed to show significant response of at least 6 weeks or longer to treatments that included anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, physiotherapy and posterior epidural steroids and/or facet joint injections. These procedures were performed during the year 2006 and all the patients have been followed up for at least 2 years.
RESULTS: Patients evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pre and immediately post procedure advised an improvement of mean 80% of their previous pain status. Follow-up revisions with 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months showed persistent improvement percentage at mean 60%. The Oswestry Disability Index showed significant changing in status pre and post procedure related to the pain control condition. No serious complications were related to the procedure.
CONCLUSIONS: Targeted Epidural endoscopy associated with injection of O(2)/O(3) and steroids is a safe and efficient minimally invasive procedure to be used in patients with refractory low back pain. The association with ozone (O(2)/O(3)) and steroids seems to result in a long lasting pain relief, giving to the physician and to the patient a wider window to work on the treatment of other frequently associated causes (emotional, socio-economic and environmental) of refractory back pain.

PMID: 21107935 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Percutaneous laser discectomy: experience and long term follow-up

By wp_zaman

The classical microsurgical approach in the treatment of herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) has been substituted over the years by endoscopical approach, in which it is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, and by percutaneous laser disc decompression and nucleotomy. Percutaneous laser disc decompression and nucleotomy have been performed worldwide in more than 40,000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc and in HNP pain is caused by disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode (Biolitec AG-Germany) laser introduced via a 21-G needle under X-ray or CT-scan guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of the nucleous pulposus shrinking the disc and relieving the pressure on the nerve root. A multicentric retrospective study with a mean follow-up of 6 years was performed on 900 patients suffering from relevant symptoms that had been therapy-resistant for 6 months on average before consulting our department. Evaluation included 585 (65%) males and 315 (35%) females. The average age of patients operated was 46 years (18-54). The success rate at a mean follow-up of 5 years (2-6 years) was about 70% with a very low complication rate