Bilateral remote cerebellar haemorrhage after spinal surgery: a case study and review of the literature.

By London Spine
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Bilateral remote cerebellar haemorrhage after spinal surgery: a case study and review of the literature.

Brain Inj. 2014;28(9):1216-22

Authors: Mallio CA, Sarà M, Pistoia ML, Occhicone F, Errante Y, Giona A, Zobel BB, Quattrocchi CC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Remote cerebellar haemorrhage is a rare and unpredictable complication after intracranial and spinal surgery, although less frequently found in the latter. The physiopathology of this phenomenon has not been definitely explained.
OBJECTIVES: To describe and discuss the potential implications and pathomechanism of a bilateral remote cerebellar haemorrhage case after spinal surgery and review the literature related to this rare phenomenon.
CASE REPORT: A 75 year-old man developed bilateral remote cerebellar haemorrhage after a lumbar laminectomy. Brain CT and MRI examinations showed chronic bilateral remote cerebellar haemorrhage, right haemoventricle and bilateral supratentorial subarachnoid haemorrhage. Subsequently, the patient underwent rehabilitation therapy with improvement of symptoms.
CONCLUSION: When large cerebrospinal fluid loss is observed during spinal surgery, brain imaging study should be carried out. The pathogenetic hypothesis of microcirculation vessels tearing, the role of previous spinal surgery and of cerebellar atrophy should be considered and validated with further investigation.

PMID: 24865277 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Case review. Lemierre’s syndrome.

By London Spine
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Case review. Lemierre’s syndrome.

J Fam Pract. 2014 Apr;63(4):193-6

Authors: Asnani J, Jones S

Abstract
A previously healthy 35-year-old man with a one-week history of left-sided neck pain and fever as high as 104°F sought care at our emergency department. He was given a diagnosis of viral pharyngitis and discharged. He returned the next day and indicated that he was now experiencing drenching night sweats and weakness.

PMID: 24905121 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Effects of Kinesio® Tape in low back muscle fatigue: Randomized, controlled, doubled-blinded clinical trial on healthy subjects.

By London Spine
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Effects of Kinesio® Tape in low back muscle fatigue: Randomized, controlled, doubled-blinded clinical trial on healthy subjects.

J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2013 Nov 27;

Authors: Alvarez-Álvarez S, Jose FG, Rodríguez-Fernández AL, Güeita Rodríguez J, Benjamin JW

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Muscle fatigue of the trunk extensor musculature plays a considerable role in chronic low back pain (LBP). The underlying physiology of fatigue is complex and not fully understood. The Kinesio® Taping (KT) supports damaged structures while allowing mobility and at the same time may influence some of the mechanisms associated with muscle fatigue such as blood flow and proprioception.
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to determine the influence of KT on the resistance to fatigue of the lumbar extensor musculature in a sample of young healthy subjects.
METHODS: A randomized, controlled, doubled-blinded clinical trial was conducted. Ninety nine healthy subjects were randomized in to the three arms of the study Kinesio® Tape (KT), placebo (P) and control (C). Directly after application of KT we measured lumbar extensor musculature endurance with the Biering-Sorensen test. Subjects and researchers were blinded to the intervention. Time achieved (seconds) was compared between groups with one-way ANOVA with confidence intervals of 95%.
RESULTS: There were significant differences between the time achieved in the KT group versus the control group (p < 0.05). The placebo group performed better than the control group but worse than the KT group, these were not significant in either case.
CONCLUSIONS: KT appears to improve the time to failure of the extensor muscle of the trunk obtained using the Biering-Sorensen test. These findings suggest that KT influences processes that lead to muscle fatigue and that KT could be effective in the management of LBP.

PMID: 24284272 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Can a self-administered questionnaire identify workers with chronic or recurring low back pain?

By London Spine

Can a self-administered questionnaire identify workers with chronic or recurring low back pain?

Ind Health. 2015 Mar 26;

Authors: Takekawa KS, Gonçalves JS, Moriguchi CS, Coury HJ, Sato TO

Abstract
To verify if the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and physical examination of the lumbar spine can identify workers with chronic or recurring low back pain, using health history for reference. Fifty office workers of both sexes, aged between 19 and 55 years, were evaluated using a standardized physical examination and the NMQ, VAS and RDQ. Discriminant analysis was performed to determine the discriminant properties of these instruments. A higher success rate (94%) was observed in the model including only the NMQ and in the model including the NMQ and the physical examination. The lowest success rate (82%) was observed in the model including the NMQ, RDQ and VAS. The NMQ was able to detect subjects with chronic or recurring low back pain with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity. The NMQ appears to be the best instrument for identifying subjects with chronic or recurring low back pain. Thus, this self-reported questionnaire is suitable for screening workers for chronic or recurring low back pain in occupational settings.

PMID: 25810448 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]