Kinesiophobia in relation to physical activity in chronic neck pain.

By London Spine

Kinesiophobia in relation to physical activity in chronic neck pain.

J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2015 Mar 26;

Authors: Demirbüken İ, Özgül B, Kuru Çolak T, Aydoğdu O, Sari Z, Yurdalan SU

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Little research is available concerning physical activity and its determinants in people with chronic neck pain.
OBJECTIVE: To explore the relation between kinesiophobia and physical activity and gender effect on these relations in people with chronic neck pain.
METHODS: Ninety-nine subjects (34 men and 65 women) with chronic neck pain were participated in the study. Pain intensity was assessed with Visual Analog Scale and kinesiophobia degree was determined by using Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Level of physical activity was assessed with short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire.
RESULTS: There was no statistically correlation between neck pain intensity and kinesiophobia degree (p=0.246, r=0.123) and physical activity level (p=0.432, r=-0.083). It was also found that kinesiophobia degree was not correlated to physical activity level (p=0.148, r=-0.153). There was a negative correlation between kinesiophobia degree and physical activity level only for women, not for men (p=0.011, r=-0.318).
CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that although people with chronic neck pain reported higher pain intensity and fear of movement, pain intensity and kinesiophobia degree did not associate to their physical activity levels. It can be speculated that high kinesiophobia degrees cause low physical activity levels for women, but not for men.

PMID: 25812549 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

The optimal treatment of type II and III odontoid fractures in the elderly: a systematic review.

By London Spine
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The optimal treatment of type II and III odontoid fractures in the elderly: a systematic review.

Eur Spine J. 2013 Jan;22(1):1-13

Authors: Huybregts JG, Jacobs WC, Vleggeert-Lankamp CL

Abstract
PURPOSE: Odontoid fractures are the most common cervical spine fractures in the elderly. As the population ages, their incidence is expected to increase progressively. The optimal treatment of this condition is still the subject of controversy. The objective of this review is to summarize and compare the outcome of surgical and conservative interventions in the elderly (≥ 65 years).
METHODS: A comprehensive search was conducted in nine databases of medical literature, supplemented by reference and citation tracking. Clinical status was considered the primary outcome. Fracture union and stability rates were considered secondary outcomes.
RESULTS: A total of nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria. All studies were performed retrospectively and were of limited quality. There was insufficient data, especially from direct comparisons, to determine the difference in clinical outcome between surgical and conservative interventions. Osseous union was achieved in 66-85 % of surgically treated patients and in 28-44 % of conservatively treated patients. Fracture stability was achieved in 82-97 % of surgically patients and in 53-79 % of conservatively treated patients.
CONCLUSIONS: There was insufficient data to determine a potential difference in clinical outcome between different treatment groups. Surgically treated patients showed higher osseous union rates compared to conservatively treated patients, possibly because of different selection mechanisms. The majority of patients appears to achieve fracture stability regardless of the applied treatment. A prospective trial with appropriate sample size is needed to identify the optimal treatment of odontoid fractures in the elderly and predictors for the success of either one of the available treatments.

PMID: 22941218 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Complications of neuroimaging.

By London Spine

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Complications of neuroimaging.
Handb Clin Neurol. 2014;121:1743-50
Authors: Rosenblum JD, Pasternak O, Mitchell MM
Abstract
Modern imaging techniques with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic…

Finite element analysis and cadaveric cinematic analysis of fixation options for anteriorly implanted trabecular metal interbody cages.

By London Spine
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Finite element analysis and cadaveric cinematic analysis of fixation options for anteriorly implanted trabecular metal interbody cages.

Eur Spine J. 2015 Oct 9;

Authors: Berjano P, Blanco JF, Rendon D, Villafañe JH, Pescador D, Atienza CM

Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess, with finite element analysis and an in vitro biomechanical study in cadaver, whether the implementation of an anterior interbody cage made of hedrocel with nitinol shape memory staples in compression increases the stiffness of the stand-alone interbody cage and to compare these constructs’ stiffness to other constructs common in clinical practice.
METHODS: A biomechanical study with a finite element analysis and cadaveric testing assessed the stiffness of different fixation modes for the L4-L5 functional spinal unit: intact spine, destabilized spine with discectomy, posterior pedicle-screw fixation, anterior stand-alone interbody cage, anterior interbody cage with bilateral pedicle screws and anterior interbody cage with two shape memory staples in compression. These modalities of vertebral fixation were compared in four loading modes (flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation).
RESULTS: The L4-L5 spinal unit with an anterior interbody cage and two staples was stiffer than the stand-alone cage. The construct stiffness was similar to that of a model of posterior pedicular stabilization. The stiffness was lower than that of the anterior cage plus bilateral pedicle-screw fixation.
CONCLUSION: The use of an anterior interbody implant with shape memory staples in compression may be an alternative to isolated posterior fixation and to anterior isolated implants, with increased stiffness.

PMID: 26452680 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Low Back Pain and Obesity.

By London Spine
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Low Back Pain and Obesity.

Med Arch. 2015 Apr;69(2):114-116

Authors: Ibrahimi-Kaçuri D, Murtezani A, Rrecaj S, Martinaj M, Haxhiu B

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Low back pain poses a significant problem in clinics and public health. It presents one of the main problems with adults, since 70-80% of adults experience it at least once in their lifetime. Causes of the low back pain are numerous and often unknown.
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study is to find the most prevalent age group, pain localisation, and the frequency of physical therapy sessions in obese and non-obese subjects with LBP.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study has been conducted by the Physical Rehabilitation Service of the Occupational Medicine Institute, during one year period. The total number of patients studied was 101 and all were Kosovo Energy Corporation (KEC) employees. The study was retrospective.
RESULTS: Looking at the body weight index, out of 101 patients, 69.3% are classified as non-obese and 30.7% as obese. Using T-Test we have found a difference of high statistical significance between the average number of the physical therapy sessions applied in relation to the examined groups (T-Test=2.78, P=0.0065, so, P<0.01).
CONCLUSION: Obesity and age have no direct influence in back pain, but they could prolong healing. Professional occupation and binding position are factors that affect back pain. Physical workload can cause the manifestation of sciatica; whereas psycho-social factors can prolong the overall healing process.

PMID: 26005262 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]