Experimental infection with Trichinella T12 in domestic cats.

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Experimental infection with Trichinella T12 in domestic cats.

Vet Parasitol. 2013 May 20;194(2-4):168-70

Authors: Ribicich M, Krivokapich S, Pasqualetti M, Gonzalez Prous CL, Gatti GM, Falzoni E, Aronowicz T, Arbusti P, Fariña F, Rosa A

Abstract
Trichinella spiralis has been documented in wild animals in Argentina, including puma, armadillos, rats and wild boars. In 2008, molecular analysis identified Trichinella T12 from a naturally infected puma (Puma concolor) from Patagonia. The aim of the present work was to study the relationship between the infectivity and pathology of Trichinella T12 in the puma and in domestic cats, and the possible risks that may be present for transmission among these animals. Two cats (A and B) were orally-infected with 3300 and 1850 Trichinella T12 muscle larvae, respectively; one additional cat was used as a control. During the 54 days post-infection, a daily examination was performed which included monitoring body temperature, and cardiac and respiration rates; the animals were then euthanized. Hematological studies included hematocrit (%), hemoglobin (g/dl), and white cell, neutrophil, lymphocyte and eosinophil counts. Blood biochemistry included urea, creatinine, AST, ALT, CK, LDH and ALP. An ELISA assay was also performed. At necropsy, organs (liver, spleen, brain, cerebellum and kidney), nails and muscle samples were obtained for histopathology studies and artificial digestion. The muscles that were studied included the diaphragm, massetter, cutaneous, temporal, intercostals, lumbar, tongue, limbs, neck and tail. Clinical signs, such as anorexia, diarrhea, vomiting, shaggy hair, decay and muscle pain, were observed in both cats. The eosinophil counts were elevated in both cats A and B. Trichinella larvae were recovered from all of the muscles analyzed where the histopathology showed larvae in several muscles without degenerative reaction. Neither larvae nor lesions were observed in non-muscular organs. Cat A had a maximum of 246 larvae per gram (lpg) in the temporal muscle and a minimum of 80 lpg in the tongue, while cat B had a maximum of 65 lpg in muscles of the leg and a minimum of 10 lpg in tail muscles. This study represents the first record of experimental infection of cats with Trichinella T12.

PMID: 23474230 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Transverse myelitis and acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy due to Legionella pneumophila: a case report.

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Transverse myelitis and acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy due to Legionella pneumophila: a case report.

Pediatr Int. 2013 Dec;55(6):778-82

Authors: Canpolat M, Kumandas S, Yikilmaz A, Gumus H, Koseoglu E, Poyrazoğlu HG, Kose M, Per H

Abstract
Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rapidly progressive symmetrical muscle weakness associated with acute inflammatory disease. Transverse myelitis (TM) is the inflammation of the spinal cord characterized by rapidly evolving muscle weakness in the lower extremities, defects in sensory level and sphincter dysfunction. Guillain-Barré syndrome, and TM association occurs very rarely in childhood. A 7-year-old girl presented with complaints of neck pain, spout-style vomiting, cough, shortness of breath, and acute paraparesis with sensory and sphincter disturbance. The patient was intubated because of increased respiratory distress. A positive direct fluorescein antigen test in bronchoalveolar lavage confirmed Legionella pneumophila infection. Imaging and neurophysiologic studies were diagnostic for TM with acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. She was treated with a combination of high-dose methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulins, and we observed incomplete recovery. The presented case is the first child with concomitant TM and acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy related to L. pneumophila infection.

PMID: 24330286 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]